Ulrike Frick

BS 152906 3356

Mr. Haneke gave me that “moment” when a great work of art suddenly hits you and changes your life or even just your thinking forever.

It’s all Michael Haneke’s fault. In the late 1980s, when I was still in school, I wanted to get a taste of the Filmfest with a friend. Maybe even see a film, if we could get hold of a ticket. Somehow we ended up at the Rio movie theater and the premiere of THE SEVENTH CONTINENT. I was completely enthralled. My friend just said, “I have to remember that name — so that I never watch anything like that again.”

Thanks to my mother, who didn’t want to watch westerns and thrillers late at night on TV by herself, I already had some experience in film appreciation by this time, just more in the direction of Hitchcock and Huston, Peckinpah and Polanski. At any rate, I’d been watching whatever was playing at movie theaters since ARISTOCATS came out. But for the first time, Mr. Haneke gave me that “moment” when a great work of art suddenly hits you and changes your life or even just your thinking forever. ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN and the US TV series LOU GRANT later made me want to become a journalist rather than a director. But film always stayed with me.

After a traineeship right after graduating from high school, I studied history and German literature all the way through to a doctorate. Since then, I’ve been writing about theater, literature, film, and television, previously as a staff writer, nowadays as a freelancer. A job as editor-in-chief — because I was the only editor — of the festival magazine brought me to FILMFEST MÜNCHEN in 2003. Now, as a program curator, I am responsible for the category of German-language television. I still experience that “moment” every now and then, with movies and theater productions — by no means only with Haneke — and, despite all the criticism of German television, often with TV shows as well.